The Final “Avengers: Infinity War Trailer” Is Out, But….

Unless you live under a rock, or ya know…had other responsibilities, you’ve probably heard and/or seen the new Avengers: Infinity War trailer that dropped today.

As if there were any doubt, it looks amazing. For all it’s wonderful inclusions, I’d like to know what you all think!

An even better question (please leave your answer in the comments below) is, what character would you like to see introduced in this movie that has not yet been in a MCU film?

My vote? Well, I’m going to cheat here because it’s less of a singular character and more of a group. How much would you all freak out if, say, in the post credits sequence, a certain ship materializes out of a certain negative zone with a certain family of Four…. OR…better yet, a slow zoom to Thor, laying unconscious on the ground, as we close in on his face, what looks like a rocky hand pinches his nose and leans in over his face, Thor comes to, flailing then as lucidity comes and his vision starts to correct, he says softly, “Korg? What has happened to you?” to which our ORANGE rocky friend replies, “Korg? That’s the last time I try mouth-ta-mouth resuscitation with a guy that calls himself a thunder god…” The camera zooms back out as we see the rest of the FANTASTIC FOUR come into view!!!




If you’ve been a fan of science fiction television and movies for a bit, there’s a good chance that you’re familiar with actor David Hewlett. He’s best known as the snarky, take-in-small-doses Doctor Rodney McKay who was featured as a recurring character in SG-1 only to be promoted to a regular in my personal favorite entry in the franchise, Stargate: Atlantis, but you may also know him from Rise of the Planet of the ApesDark Matter, the amazing cult classics Cube and Pin (so creepy), and most recently in the Golden Globe winning, Academy Award nominated (SO MANY NOMINATIONS!! Congrats Guillermo!!), The Shape of Water.

What you may not know about this British-born, Canadian-raised actor is Continue reading


200 Years Of Frankenstein

200 years ago this month, a 20 year old Mary Shelley would see the 1st publication of her story about a scientist who had unlocked the door to our universe’ greatest mystery. Life.

Life he would give to his creation, who, misunderstood and full of angst and anger at a life never asked for, would pursue him to the end of his days.

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein or, The Modern Prometheus would become not only one of the single most famous and prolifically copied books of all time, it also is widely considered to be the very first Continue reading


Franchise Wars

With the release of the Avengers: Infinity War trailer dropping earlier this week, and the release of Star Wars: The Last Jedi due out in a few days, nerd-dom is at its highest of levels right now. And while I cannot wait to see The Last Jedi in theaters on opening day, I’ve come to realize that I am more excited for Avengers than I am for Star Wars.

To some, this may seem sacrilegious. The franchises aren’t even in the same category or genre. How can they even be compared?
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Just Let Lumpy Stare At You

In an interesting move, the infamous Star Wars Holiday Special has had it’s first tug into canon.

In the new Star Wars anthology book, From a Certain Point of View, there are 40 fun stories highlighting the ancillary characters in our favorite galaxy far, far away. The love and attention given to background characters in the Star Wars universe has long been a linchpin of its popularity starting with the release of the toys from the very first movie. Characters that had no lines and sometimes barely a second of screen time got a name, a figure and a back story. These would lay the foundation for some of the best Star Wars literature ever released. Although now cast to the “Legends” pile, the great “Tales of the Bounty Hunters” was one of my favorite examples of this. The story of Dengar and his wife saving Boba Fett is a classic… But I digress.

One of the stories contained in From a Certain Point of View is called, We Don’t Serve Their Kind Here by Chuck Wendig and is a fun little tale of Mos Eisley Cantina’s bartender, Wuher who mentions two characters by name, Ackmena and her wife Sorschi.

Why is this important?



The King Is Dead. Long Live The King of Monsters.

Anyone who knows me, knows I have a love for a LOT of different things. Some wonder how I can keep track of it all, but I’d say if you ask the people who really know me what my favorite things are, they’ll tell you, tacos, coffee, road trips, Dinosaur Jr, cardigan sweaters, and Godzilla.

So it is with a very, very heavy heart that today, we say goodbye to Haruo Nakajima. Better known as Godzilla.

Not just ANY Godzilla either. Nakajima was THE original King of Monsters in the 1954 film. However, perhaps more importantly, he remained to play Godzilla in throughout the Showa era until his retirement from the role, ending with 1972’s Godzilla vs Gigan. These are the Godzilla movies that most of us who grew up with them know and love the best. From starting out as the frightening, then transforming to the goofy, the crazy, the occasionally trippy, the monster, the hero. The King.

Below this, I’ve listed all the kaiju movies he’s done. You’ll notice that he wasn’t JUST Godzilla. He was the original Mothra, Rodan and Mogera as well as a host of others.

Outside of the beloved Kaiju movies, he was also in a few of Akira Kurosawa’s famous samurai film, notably, Seven Samurai.

Nakjima is still considered the best suit actor ever. To the Japanese film industry, he was what Andy Serkis now is to mocap. You knew when he was in that suit because he had certain moves, the way he walked, fought, waved his hands around, reacted to things… So many people are dismissive of Godzilla movies as rubber-monster-camp. To an extent they’re right. Just watch some of the goofier entries. I won’t deny the campiness of those films. What you can’t be dismissive of, is the talent that really brought Godzilla to life for so many of us. I’ve often said that the greatest actors are the ones that make you forget who’s behind the portrayal. With the heavy suits on though, Nakajima instead reminded us who was inside the portrayal.

In an interview, he was asked, “What is Godzilla to you?” and his response nails it;

He’s my partner! He’s my partner. He can’t be a character without me, but I get inside and he’s the boss.
He’s the boss, but I’m his partner. We can’t stand alone. We’re partners because we share the same feelings.

The wonderful thing is, he never stopped being a hero to legions and generations of kaiju fans. Up to this past year, he was still making the rounds. Hitting the convention circuit, always smiling, always happy to meet new and younger fans. He was kind and humble for his station. In this new age of CGI, as wild as it is, you can never replace the fun and heart of those older films.

Just as you can never replace Haruo Nakajima.

Here’s a short video of the last time Nakjima donned the Godzilla mantel. In 1983. The suit he’s wearing here was made for Godzilla’s 25th Anniversary in 1979. However, the wonderful thing is, once he’s going, he IS Godzilla. Those classic, signature moves, the stance… That’s love.

  • 1954 – Godzilla (Godzilla, Newspaper Writer)
  • 1955 – Godzilla Raids Again (Godzilla)
  • 1956 – Rodan (Rodan, Meganulon, JSDF Officer)
  • 1957 – The Mysterians (Mogera, JDSF Officer)
  • 1958 – Varan the Unbelievable (Varan)
  • 1961 – Mothra (Mothra)
  • 1962 – King Kong vs. Godzilla (Godzilla)
  • 1963 – Matango (Matango)
  • 1963 – Atragon
  • 1964 – Mothra vs. Godzilla (Godzilla)
  • 1964 – Dogora, the Space Monster
  • 1964 – Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster (Godzilla)
  • 1965 – Frankenstein vs. Baragon (Baragon)
  • 1965 – Invasion of the Astro-Monster (Godzilla)
  • 1966 – The War of the Gargantuas (Gaira)
  • 1966 – Godzilla vs. the Sea Monster (Godzilla)
  • 1967 – Son of Godzilla (Godzilla; water scenes only)
  • 1967 – King Kong Escapes (King Kong)
  • 1968 – Destroy All Monsters (Godzilla, Military Adviser)
  • 1969 – Latitude Zero (Gryphon, Manbat, Giant Rat, Lion)
  • 1969 – All Monsters Attack (Godzilla)
  • 1970 – Space Amoeba (Gezora, Ganime)
  • 1971 – Godzilla vs. Hedorah (Godzilla)
  • 1972 – Godzilla vs. Gigan (Godzilla, Comic Book Publisher, Defense Forces Officer)

Credit to who ever made this collage. It’s awesome.


A Worried Man Searches For The Human Highway

This started out as a Facebook post. Then it got long. Then it turned into a story that I thought was better shared here. If you enjoy it, awesome. If you don’t, I get it. It’s long, but not as long as my wait for a song.

Here’s one of many tales of being a nerd in the days before the internet. I’ll peg this around 1989 – 1990-ish. Continue reading


Beauty, Beast, and the 4DX Theater


After months of hearing about this new 4DX Theatre experience, I finally got my tickets to see “Beauty & the Beast” hoping that the scene with “Be Our Guest” would include a lot of scents of croissants and freshly baked goodies. Sadly, it didn’t.

At $30 a ticket, the price may seem a bit steep but it is the novelty you are paying for. You are able to reserve your seats ahead of time and there is an option to turn off the water spray (but why bother). The movements of the seats were not jerky but incredibly smooth and flowed great with the film without taking you out of it. Air blew in your face at the right times but the water felt forced. When it was raining, a spritz of water hit your face and then that was it.
Continue reading


The “Kong: Skull Island” May Be the Greatest Trailer Ever 

ksiThere really are too many movies coming out in the next few months to be excited about, but by all the gods, old and new, the final trailer for Kong: Skull Island has to be one of the most skillfully edited I have ever seen. For such an effects laden movie, the visuals take a back seat here to the sound. The music, effects, the timing…THE TIMING…. It deserves an award. So, without further ado, sit back, put on a pair of headphones or turn up your volume and behold:

Kong: Skull Island releases on Friday, March 10th in theaters nationwide.